Clone or Copy My Hard Drive with Norton Ghost


computer management prepare disk to copy 1 Clone or Copy My Hard Drive with Norton Ghost

When upgrading your hard drive to a bigger faster hard drive the Norton Ghost utility called Copy My Hard Drive can make the upgrade quick, easy, and painless. Copy My Hard Drive used to be referred to as cloning the hard drive.

First we’ll need to prepare the new hard drive. Click the Windows Start button -> Control Panel -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management -> Disk Management.

Read More →

Latest comments by:

  • Jamie Harding
    Thanks , why Nortons site couldnt post this, your instructions are clear and to the point. good work
  • Uffbrock
    Same problem as Bob - after copying, removing the original drive and and rebooting, I was presented with the \"preparing ...



Short Link - http://ngurl.me/3p Posted on October 17, 2009 at 11:22 pm (PST)
Tags: | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |

Disk Defragment Windows Vista from the Command Line


The Windows Vista Disk Defragmenter has been improved over the Windows XP version, but you can’t see or use all the best features unless you run it from the command line. By default the defrag tool only defragments files smaller than 64 MB, because according to Microsoft’s benchmarks, fragments of this size, which already consist of at least 16000 contiguous clusters, have a negligible impact on performance. If you still want to defrag files larger than 64 MB too, you need to use the -w switch mentioned below to defragment files of all size.

Disk Defragmenter does not defragment files in the Recycle Bin, or files which are in use. Disk Defragmenter will not degragment Bootsect dos, Safeboot fs, Safeboot csv, Safeboot rsv, Hiberfil sys, Memory dmp, or the Windows page file. Using the -b parameter will optimize these boot files.

Some swtiches that are available from the command line for Disk Defragmenter are:
<volume>
      Specifies the drive letter or mount point path of the volume to
              be defragmented or analyzed.

-c            Defragments all volumes on this computer.
              Don’t specify a drive letter while using this.

-a            Performs fragmentation analysis only.

-r            Performs partial defragmentation (default). Attempts to
              consolidate only fragments smaller than 64 megabytes (MB).

-w            Performs full defragmentation. Attempts to consolidate all file
              fragments, regardless of their size, even 64 MB files.

-f            Forces defragmentation of the volume when free space is low.
              A volume must have at least 15 % free space before Disk Defragmenter
              can completely defragment it.

-i            This makes Defrag run in the background, and operate only if the
              computer is idle, like when run as a scheduled task.

-b            Optimizes boot files and applications only. Use this option
              during a separate defrag operation.

-v            Specifies verbose mode. The defragmentation and analysis output
              is more detailed.

The only indication you will get is a blinking cursor. This means that the process is going. To interrupt the defragmentation process, press Ctrl + C in the command window.

If you find that you are unable to defragment or cannot run the defragment utility in Vista or that a drive or volume has been marked by Vista as having errors, run chdsk by entering:

chkdsk c: /f

… at a command prompt; where c is the drive letter. You will be able to then run Defrag after Chkdsk has repaired the file system.

To run you will need to run the command line prompt as the Administrator. If you’re not sure how to open a command line, or open it as an Administrator click here.

To defrag you boot files enter into the command line:

defrag c: -b

To defrag all files on all drives/volumes, even the files over 64 MB enter into the command line:

defrag -cwv

This may take a while, but you’ll see a report for each drive. The cursor will blink until finished, then it will return to the command prompt.

defrag command line settings vista 1 Disk Defragment Windows Vista from the Command Line

Here are a few other examples:

defrag d:
defrag d:’vol’mountpoint -w -f
defrag d: -a -v

You could use the command line once a week, or even once a month, in addition to daily default defragmenting to keep your computer running faster.

Latest comments by:

  • Alexander
    Thank you for publishing some of the undocumented defrag command line switches. Any idea what the -e and -g ...
  • Ironman
    For defragmenting, I use Diskeeper on my Vista Business equipped Thinkpad, and it is fantastic. Very easy to use, defrags ...



Short Link - http://ngurl.me/cz Posted on February 3, 2008 at 12:01 am (PST)
Tags: | | |

Windows Vista Shows Less Than 4 GB of RAM Installed


less ram than installed 1 Windows Vista Shows Less Than 4 GB of RAM Installed

A lot of people these days are buying home computers with 4 to 8 GB of RAM, only to discover Windows Vista is reporting that the installed Memory (RAM) is 3 to 7 GB. Two easy ways to find out how much RAM is really in your computer is to reboot, and go into the BIOS setup to view the total RAM listed there, or you can download and use CPUID to give you an accurate listing of all the main components installed. One caveat with CPUID is that it may not report the speed (MHz) of your RAM properly if it wasn’t labelled properly by the manufacturer, but that doesn’t mean the RAM isn’t performing at the speed listed by your computer manufacturer.

Microsoft does have a workaround, however, it requires certain hardware, and a 64 bit version of Windows Vista to get past the 4 GB RAM limit. For those using 8 GB of RAM, all the right hardware, and the 64 bit version of Windows Vista, there is no fix. Some memory, like video card memory, shares some of the RAM with Vista, rather than running in its own separate space.

Here’s what Microsoft says in their knowledge base article 929605 regarding this issue:

If a computer has 4 gigabytes (GB) of random-access memory (RAM) installed, the system memory that is reported in the System Information dialog box in Windows Vista is less than you expect. For example, the System Information dialog box may report 3,120 megabytes (MB) of system memory on a computer that has 4 GB of memory installed (4,096 MB).

Note, you can access the System Information dialog box in the following ways:

  • Click Start, type System in the Search box, and then click System under Programs.
  • Double-click System in Control Panel.
  • Click Start, right-click Computer, and then click Properties.
  • Click Show more details in the Windows Vista Welcome Center window.

CAUSE

This behavior is the expected result of certain hardware and software factors.

Various devices in a typical computer require memory-mapped access. This is known as memory-mapped I/O (MMIO). For the MMIO space to be available to 32-bit operating systems, the MMIO space must reside within the first 4 GB of address space.

For example, if you have a video card that has 256 MB of onboard memory, that memory must be mapped within the first 4 GB of address space. If 4 GB of system memory is already installed, part of that address space must be reserved by the graphics memory mapping. Graphics memory mapping overwrites a part of the system memory. These conditions reduce the total amount of system memory that is available to the operating system.

The reduction in available system memory depends on the devices that are installed in the computer. However, to avoid potential driver compatibility issues, the 32-bit versions of Windows Vista limit the total available memory to 3.12 GB. See the "More information" section for information about potential driver compatibility issues.

If a computer has many installed devices, the available memory may be reduced to 3 GB or less. However, the maximum memory available in 32-bit versions of Windows Vista is typically 3.12 GB.

WORKAROUND

For Windows Vista to use all 4 GB of memory on a computer that has 4 GB of memory installed, the computer must meet the following requirements:

The chipset must support at least 8 GB of address space. Chipsets that have this capability include the following:

  • Intel 975X
  • Intel P965
  • Intel 955X on Socket 775
  • Chipsets that support AMD processors that use socket F, socket 940, socket 939, or socket AM2. These chipsets include any AMD socket and CPU combination in which the memory controller resides in the CPU.
  • The CPU must support the x64 instruction set. The AMD64 CPU and the Intel EM64T CPU support this instruction set.
  • The BIOS must support the memory remapping feature. The memory remapping feature allows for the segment of system memory that was previously overwritten by the Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) configuration space to be remapped above the 4 GB address line. This feature must be enabled in the BIOS configuration utility on the computer. View your computer product documentation for instructions that explain how to enable this feature. Many consumer-oriented computers may not support the memory remapping feature. No standard terminology is used in documentation or in BIOS configuration utilities for this feature. Therefore, you may have to read the descriptions of the various BIOS configuration settings that are available to determine whether any of the settings enable the memory remapping feature.
  • An x64 (64-bit) version of Windows Vista must be used.

Contact the computer vendor to determine whether your computer meets these requirements.

Note When the physical RAM that is installed on a computer equals the address space that is supported by the chipset, the total system memory that is available to the operating system is always less than the physical RAM that is installed. For example, consider a computer that has an Intel 975X chipset that supports 8 GB of address space. If you install 8 GB of RAM, the system memory that is available to the operating system will be reduced by the PCI configuration requirements. In this scenario, PCI configuration requirements reduce the memory that is available to the operating system by an amount that is between approximately 200 MB and approximately 1 GB. The reduction depends on the configuration.


Short Link - http://ngurl.me/9i Posted on February 2, 2008 at 7:58 pm (PST)
Tags: | |

My Network Connection Icon Disappeared from the System Tray


If the network connection icon is no longer in your system tray, there is an easy way to bring it back.

To open the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog window, click the Start button, then Run. Now type into the Run box, or the Start Search box:

control.exe /name Microsoft.TaskbarAndStartMenu

… and hit enter.

network icon missing 3 My Network Connection Icon Disappeared from the System Tray

To open the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog window you can also right click on the taskbar, and left click on Properties.

network icon missing 1 My Network Connection Icon Disappeared from the System Tray

Once the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog window is open click on the Notification Area tab. Check the Network box, and click OK.

network icon missing 2 My Network Connection Icon Disappeared from the System Tray

Your Network icon should now be back in the System Tray. If the problem is fixed stop reading.

If you’re now pulling your hair out saying "The Network checkbox is grayed out!" There is a fix for that too.

Click the Start button, then type regedit into either the Start Search box, or the Run box, and hit enter. Now navigate down the Registry tree until you find the following registry key:

HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareClassesLocal SettingsSoftwareMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionTrayNotify

Before making any changes you can either backup the entire Registry, or just the key you are about to make changes to. If you choose to only back up the TrayNotify registry key then right click on TrayNotify and left click Export. Give the file a name, and click save.

network icon missing 5 My Network Connection Icon Disappeared from the System Tray

Now select IconStreams, right click and choose delete. Repeat this process by selecting PastIconsStream, right click and delete.

network icon missing 6 My Network Connection Icon Disappeared from the System Tray

Exit the Registry editor. To make the changes you made take effect you can restart explorer, log off and log back on, or reboot the computer.

When you open the Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog window the Network check box should no longer be grayed out. Now check the Network box, click OK, and you’re Network Connection Icon should reappear in the System Tray.

Latest comments by:

  • bizgms@aol.com
    Brilliant! Clear and easy to follow instructions with very helpful images. It worked for me. Thanks.
  • mikeh
    fabulous...worked like a charm...thanks.



Short Link - http://ngurl.me/9h Posted on February 1, 2008 at 9:27 pm (PST)
Tags: | | | | | | |

Vista Shell Commands List and How To Use Them


Shell commands provide quick access to many folders locations. For example, you can use the command:

shell:My Music

… to open your music folder. You can then create shortcuts to that folder, from that folder, find out where that folder is located, create new folders inside that folder, or even move files to and from that folder.

To use a shell command copy and paste, or type the shell command, into the Start Search box …

shell commands 1 Vista Shell Commands List and How To Use Them

or the Run box…

shell commands 2 Vista Shell Commands List and How To Use Them

and hit enter. Go ahead and try the shell:My Music command.

The complete list of Vista shell commands is below:

Note: Some of these shell commands will only work on the 64 bit version of Vista.

  • shell:AddNewProgramsFolder – Opens the Install a program from the network location.
  • shell:Administrative Tools – Opens the Administrative Tools section of the Control Panel.
  • shell:AppData – Opens the hidden location C:’Users’(your username)’AppData’Roaming
  • shell:AppUpdatesFolder – Opens the Installed Windows Updates location in Program and Files.
  • shell:Cache – Opens Internet Explorer’s temporary internet files folder.
  • shell:CD Burning – Opens the location where files are stored temporarily before Windows Vista burns them.
  • shell:ChangeRemoveProgramsFolder – Opens Programs and Features in the Control Panel.
  • shell:Common Administrative Tools – Opens the Administrative Tools section of the Control Panel.
  • shell:Common AppData – Opens the hidden location C:’ProgramData
  • shell:Common Desktop – Opens the Public Users Desktop folder location. C:’Users’Public’Desktop
  • shell:Common Documents – Opens the Public Users Documents folder location. C:’Users’Public’Documents
  • shell:Common Programs – Opens the Start menu shortcuts location.
  • shell:Common Start Menu – Opens the location of the shortcut links in your Start Menu.
  • shell:Common Startup – Opens the location where shortcuts to programs that are set to start when Vista boots up are saved.
  • shell:Common Templates – Opens C:’ProgramData’Microsoft’Windows’Templates
  • shell:CommonDownloads – Opens the Public Users Downloads folder location. C:’Users’Public’Downloads
  • shell:CommonMusic – Opens the Public Users Music folder location. C:’Users’Public’Music
  • shell:CommonPictures – Opens the Public Users Pictures folder location. C:’Users’Public’Pictures
  • shell:CommonVideo – Opens the Public Users Video folder location. C:’Users’Public’Videos
  • shell:ConflictFolder – Opens the Sync Center Conflicts location.
  • shell:ConnectionsFolder – Quickly open Network Connections.
  • shell:Contacts – Opens your username’s Contacts folder location.
  • shell:ControlPanelFolder – Opens the Control Panel.
  • shell:Cookies – Opens one of the folders where Internet Explorer saves cookies.
  • shell:Cookies’Low – Opens the other folder where Internet Explorer saves cookies.
  • shell:CredentialManager – Opens the hidden C:’Users’(your username)’AppData’Roaming’Microsoft’Credentials
  • shell:CryptoKeys – Opens the hidden C:’Users’(your username)’AppData’Roaming’Microsoft’Crypto
  • shell:CSCFolder
  • shell:default Gadgets – Opens the default Windows Sidebar Gadgets location.
  • shell:desktop – Opens your personal username’s Desktop folder location.
  • shell:downloads – Opens your personal username’s Downloads folder location.
  • shell:dpapiKeys – Opens the hidden C:’Users’(your username)’AppData’Roaming’Microsoft’Protect
  • shell:Favorites – Opens your personal username’s Favorites folder location.
  • shell:Fonts – Opens Vista’s Fonts folder location.
  • shell:Gadgets – Opens your user account’s Windows Sidebar Gadgets that you saved location.
  • shell:Games – Opens the Games folder from the left Start menu button location.
  • shell:GameTasks – Opens the hidden C:’Users’(your username)’AppData’Local’Microsoft’Windows’GameExplorer
  • shell:History – Opens Internet Explorer’s history of websites visited.
  • shell:InternetFolder Opens the 32 bit Internet Explorer.
  • shell:Links – Opens your personal username’s Links folder location.
  • shell:Local AppData Opens the hidden C:’Users’(your username)’AppData’Local
  • shell:LocalAppDataLow – Opend the hidden C:’Users’(your username)’AppData’LocalLow
  • shell:LocalizedResourcesDir
  • shell:MAPIFolder
  • shell:My Music – Opens your personal username’s Music folder location.
  • shell:My Pictures – Opens your personal username’s Pictures folder location.
  • shell:My Video – Opens your personal username’s Video folder location.
  • shell:MyComputerFolder – Opens Computer window.
  • shell:NetHood – Opens Network Shortcuts folder location.
  • shell:NetworkPlacesFolder Opens the Network Places location.
  • shell:OEM Links – Opens the links placed on your computer by your computer manufacturer location.
  • shell:Original Images – Opens Windows Photo Gallery Original Images folder location.
  • shell:Personal – Opens your personal username’s Documents folder location.
  • shell:PhotoAlbums – Opens the Slide Show folder location for your username’s Pictures folder.
  • shell:Playlists – Opens the Playlists folder location for your username’s Music folder.
  • shell:PrintersFolder – Opens Printers in the Control Panel.
  • shell:PrintHood – Opens the Printer Shortcuts location.
  • shell:Profile – Opens your main username folder location.
  • shell:ProgramFiles – Opens the Program Files folder.
  • shell:ProgramFilesCommon – Opens the Common Files folder in Program Files.
  • shell:ProgramFilesCommonX86 – Opens the Common Files folder in Program Files (x86).
  • shell:ProgramFilesX86 – Opens the Program Files (x86) folder.
  • shell:Programs – Opens the Start menu’s Programs shortcuts location.
  • shell:Public – Opens the Public User folder.
  • shell:PublicGameTasks – Opens C:’ProgramData’Microsoft’Windows’GameExplorer
  • shell:Quick Launch – Opens the Quick Launch shortcuts folder location.
  • shell:Recent – Opens Recent Items location.
  • shell:RecycleBinFolder – Opens the Recycle Bin folder.
  • shell:ResourceDir – Opens Vista’s Resources folder location.
  • shell:SampleMusic – Opens the Sample Music folder in the Public Users folder.
  • shell:SamplePictures – Opens the Sample Pictures folder in the Public Users folder.
  • shell:SamplePlaylists – Opens the Sample Playlist folder in the Public Users folder.
  • shell:SampleVideos – Opens the Sample Videos folder in the Public Users folder.
  • shell:SavedGames – Opens your personal username’s Saved Games folder location.
  • shell:Searches – Opens your personal username’s Searches folder location.
  • shell:SendTo – Opens the Context menu’s SendTo folder location.
  • shell:Start Menu – Opens the location of the shortcut links in your Start Menu.
  • shell:Startup – Opens the location where shortcuts to programs that are set to start when Vista boots up are saved.
  • shell:SyncCenterFolder – Opens Sync Center from the Control Panel.
  • shell:SyncResultsFolder – Opens the Sync Results for the Sync Center.
  • shell:SyncSetupFolder – Open the Setup new sync partnerships in the Sync Center.
  • shell:System – Opens the System32 folder location.
  • shell:SystemCertificates Opens the SystemCertificates folder location.
  • shell:SystemX86 – Opens the SysWowxx folder location.
  • shell:Templates – Opens the Templates folder location.
  • shell:TreePropertiesFolder
  • shell:UserProfiles – Opens the "C:’Users" location.
  • shell:UsersFilesFolder – Opens your main username folder location.
  • shell:Windows – Opens the "C:’Windows" location.

Latest comments by:

  • Harald Hafsteinn
    I\'ve tried it too in Ultimate.. not working...
  • JCRDA
    I\'ve tryed some of the commands in your list and they do not work on my Vista Home Premium, returning ...



Short Link - http://ngurl.me/3dx Posted on January 31, 2008 at 3:19 pm (PST)
Tags: | | |

Flip 3D Keyboard Shortcuts


Here are the keyboard shortcuts to use with Flip 3D.

Windows Logo Key+Tab: Keep the Windows key pressed down and repeatedly hit on the Tab key to be able to flip through the windows. You can also use the arrow key to move back and forth through the open windows, along with the mouse scroll wheel.

Windows Logo Key+CTRL+Tab: After pressing all three keys at the same time, you can take your fingers off the Windows logo and Ctrl keys, and hit on tab only, to scroll the windows. Hit enter to select one.

Alt+Tab: This will arrange your windows, horizontally in the following fashion. This feature exists in earlier versions of Windows as well.


Short Link - http://ngurl.me/4oo Posted on January 30, 2008 at 8:32 am (PST)
Tags: | | |

What if Windows Vista does not have Flip 3D? Alternative to Flip 3D


The Flip3D feature is available only in Windows Vista Home Premium, Business, Enterprise, and Ultimate versions. You must have Aero running to be able to use Flip 3D. If your version of Windows Vista does not have Flip3D, you can try the free alternative SmartFlip. Click here to download SmartFlip. If you want to spend $20 you can also get TopDesk which has more features than Flip 3D. Click here to get TopDesk. The features of Otaku Software TopDesk include:

  • Displays thumbnails of all applications, including minimized applications, in 2D and 3D views.
  • Shows thumbnails of all windows belonging to the current application.
  • Hides all windows for quick access the desktop.
  • While tiled, can display the title of the currently selected window or the titles of all tiled windows.
  • Windows can be closed and minimized/restored while tiled.
  • Completely configurable: Hot keys, mouse hotspots, floating buttons, window titles, and performance settings can all be changed.
  • Supports multiple monitors.

You can see TopDesk in action below.

video fliptiling What if Windows Vista does not have Flip 3D? Alternative to Flip 3D


Short Link - http://ngurl.me/8lj Posted on January 30, 2008 at 8:28 am (PST)
Tags: | | |

Flip 3D is Not Working


If Flip3D has stopped working, then copy and paste the following command into either Vista’s Start Menu Search box, or run box, and hit Enter.

rundll32.exe Dwmapi.dll,DwmEnableComposition

This will re-enable Aero by flushing it.


Short Link - http://ngurl.me/7lf Posted on January 30, 2008 at 8:15 am (PST)
Tags: | | |

Where is the Flip 3D Icon?


A copy of the Flip 3D icon is present in each user profile, and also in the Default user profile.

Follow these steps to restore the icon to your user account. Click Start, type the following into either the search box, or run box, and press Enter:

%systemdrive%’Users’Default’AppData’Roaming’Microsoft’Internet Explorer’Quick Launch

Right-click the Switch between windows shortcut and choose Copy (Keyboard shortcut: CTRL+C). Click Start, type the following into either the search box, or run box, and press Enter:

%userprofile%’ AppData’Roaming’Microsoft’Internet Explorer’Quick Launch

Right-click an empty area in the folder, and choose Paste (Keyboard shortcut: CTRL+V). If you don’t see the shortcut in your Quick Launch toolbar right away, log off, then log on to Windows.


Short Link - http://ngurl.me/6gl Posted on January 30, 2008 at 8:08 am (PST)
Tags: | | |

How to Create a Flip 3D Shortcut


If you accidentally deleted the Flip 3D icon in your quick launch toolbar, and you’ve tried download the Flip 3D icon provided here, but it still isn’t working then I have another solution.

Right-click on the desktop and left-click on Shortcut.

create flip 3d shortcut 1 How to Create a Flip 3D Shortcut

Type, or copy and paste the following line into the Type the location of the item box.

RunDll32 DwmApi #105

create flip 3d shortcut 2 How to Create a Flip 3D Shortcut

Click Next, and change the shortcut name. Remove rundll32.exe from the Type a name for this shortcut box.

create flip 3d shortcut 3 How to Create a Flip 3D Shortcut

In the Type a name for this shortcut type in Flip3D.

create flip 3d shortcut 4 How to Create a Flip 3D Shortcut

Click finish. Now you can double-click the shortcut to use Flip3D. You can copy and paste, or even copy the shortcut into your quick launch toolbar. If you want to got one step further, and give the icon a more familiar icon look, then right-click the new Flip3D icon, and choose properties. On the Shortcut tab click Change Icon.

create flip 3d shortcut 5 How to Create a Flip 3D Shortcut

In the Look for icons in this file box copy and paste, or type in:

%SystemRoot%’explorer.exe

Now hit enter, and you should see icons like the ones below.

create flip 3d shortcut 6 How to Create a Flip 3D Shortcut

Choose an icon like the one you see selected, or even a different one if you’d like, then click OK until all the windows are closed. Now your new Flip3D shortcut has a more familiar look.

create flip 3d shortcut 7 How to Create a Flip 3D Shortcut

Latest comments by:

  • XSevenSonata
    Does anyone know of a Registry for Flip, Not Flip 3D? All I need to know is which *.dll Flip is.
  • Javier
    So in this article you say to copy and paste the command above to change the image of the Flip ...



Short Link - http://ngurl.me/1n5 Posted on January 30, 2008 at 7:54 am (PST)
Tags: | | |


© Copyright Nerd Grind 2009 - 2010. All rights reserved.