Stop Indexing Service in Windows Vista and Windows 7 and Windows XP


stop hard drive indexing service windows vista windows 7 4 Stop Indexing Service in Windows Vista and Windows 7 and Windows XP

This article will help computer users who have found their computer getting slower and slower over the years. It’s when a person’s computer starts to slow down that they notice ads, like the example below, asking if their computer has slowed down, and then tries to sell them software to remove worms, viruses, spyware, malware, and to optimize your computer, whatever that means, but most often the problem is just a bloated Windows index database.

stop hard drive indexing service windows vista windows 7 12 Stop Indexing Service in Windows Vista and Windows 7 and Windows XP

As the years go by, and you add more and more files and programs to your computer, it slows down incrementally until one day you start considering purchasing a newer faster computer, or start to become concerned that the computer has become infected.

Before buying a new computer, adding RAM, buying a faster hard drive, or purchasing software to clean infections that can waste time and slow your computer down even further, turn off the indexing service first and see if that fixes the problem, and restores your computer back to its old fast self.

The indexing service is supposed to speed up a search for files on the hard drive, which is rarely done by most people, so it’s not like there’s much to lose by turning indexing off.

This tutorial will walk you through turning off the indexing service in Windows Vista, Windows 7, and Window XP.

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Latest comments by:

  • JR
    Wow you are such a huge helP! I was so annoyed of my windows 7 laptop when it suddenly had ...
  • Jonathan O'Sullivan
    YOU ARE A LEGEND. My computer was at 100 % CPU constantly, first checked for a virus, nothing, then delelted ...



Short Link - http://ngurl.me/79 Posted on September 28, 2009 at 10:11 pm (PST)
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How to Wipe Your Hard Drive Clean


boot and nuke How to Wipe Your Hard Drive Clean

Whether you’re trying to destroy or erase data from your hard drives when the FBI knocks on your door, or just want to securely, and permanently do emergency data destruction to protect yourself from identity theft, before you sell or recycle your computer, there’s an easy solution.

The free open-source boot disk utility, called Darik’s Boot and Nuke (DBAN), automatically and completely deletes the content of every hard disk it can find on, or connected to, your computer when you run it.

The bootable DBAN can run from CDs, DVDs, thumb drives, and floppy disks.

The process is easy:

How to automatically wipe all hard drives

WARNING: THIS WILL PERMANENTLY ERASE ALL DATA ON ALL HARD DRIVE HOOKED TO THE PC!!!

  1. Boot from the DBAN floppy or CD image.
  2. Enter ‘autonuke’ at the boot prompt.

Darik’s Boot and Nuke website is here.

Click here to download the exe to write the image to a floppy disk.

Click here if you don’t have a floppy disk, and would like to create a DBAN CD image instead.

Keep the disk in a safe place. If it falls into the wrong hands your system could be toast, or just a big toaster.


Short Link - http://ngurl.me/c3 Posted on July 17, 2008 at 11:00 pm (PST)
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How to Enable Raid Volumes in Windows XP Pro


If you really want to protect your data, RAID (Mirrored hard drives) is a great option, besides an external hard drive like the Western Digital MyBook. These videos will help you to setup Raid volumes in Windows XP Pro. The videos come in three parts.



Latest comments by:

  • Rui
    hello. thank you for the tutorial. i´ve made the process, but when i go to create new volume/ volume mirror. the system ...



Short Link - http://ngurl.me/a8 Posted on July 13, 2008 at 9:59 am (PST)
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Expose Wi-Fi Network Passwords with WirelessKeyView on Windows


wirelesskeyview header Expose Wi Fi Network Passwords with WirelessKeyView on Windows

By default Windows hides WEP and WPA keys stored on your PC to connect to various Wi-Fi networks, but freeware utility WirelessKeyView lists them for you. When you’ve forgotten that Wi-Fi network key, run WirelessKeyView to see all the networks your Windows PC has ever connected to using its default Wireless Zero Configuration mechanism. This utility doesn’t reveal keys stored by third-party network connection software. Delete keys from old networks that you no longer need, and easily copy keys to the clipboard to send or save. WirelessKeyView is a free download for Windows XP and Vista. Click here to download WirelessKeyView.


Short Link - http://ngurl.me/c4 Posted on February 8, 2008 at 11:36 am (PST)
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How to Setup a Home Network


Before you start: To decide what type of network to set up or to find out what hardware and cables you need, see What you need to set up a home network. That topic has information about the different types of networks (also known as network technologies), as well as hardware requirements for each type.

Once you know what type of network you want and have the necessary hardware, there are four possible steps to take (two of these are not always required):

1. Install any necessary hardware.
2. Set up an Internet connection (optional).
3. Connect the computers.
4. Run the Set Up a Wireless Router or Access Point wizard (wireless only).

Each of these steps is described in detail later in this article.

Start by setting up one computer. Once you set up the network and you are sure that the first computer is working correctly, you can add additional computers or devices.

Note: This information is designed for people who have a broadband connection (usually DSL or cable) to the Internet rather than a dial-up connection.

Install the hardware

Install network adapters in any computers that need them. (Follow the installation instructions in the information that came with each adapter.)

Set up or verify an Internet connection (optional)

You don’t need an Internet connection to set up a network, although most people want to use their network to share an Internet connection. To set up an Internet connection, you need a cable or DSL modem and an account with an Internet service provider (ISP). Then open the Connect to the Internet wizard and follow the instructions. For more information, see What do I need to connect to the Internet?

If you already have an Internet connection, you just need to verify that the connection is working. To do that, open your web browser and go to a website that you don’t usually visit. (If you go to a website that you visit often, some of its web pages might be stored on your computer and will display correctly even if your connection is faulty.) If the website opens and you don’t get any error messages, your connection is working.

To share an Internet connection

You can also share one Internet connection among two or more network computers. To do that, you can either use an intermediary device or set up Internet Connection Sharing (ICS). Your ISP might charge a fee for multiple Internet connections. Ask your ISP for information about this.

Use an intermediary device

You can use a router or a combined router and modem (also called an Internet gateway) to share an Internet connection. If you use a router, connect it to both the modem and the computer with the Internet connection, and then verify your Internet connection again. The information that came with the router should include connection instructions. If you use a combined router and modem, plug it into any computer. Check the information that came with the device for more detailed connection instructions.

Note

The router and modem must be turned on to use the Internet connection from any of the computers on your network.

Set up ICS

If you want to share an Internet connection and you don’t want to buy any more equipment, you can set up ICS on the computer that is connected to the modem. That computer will also need two network adapters: one to connect to the modem and one to connect to the other computer. ICS is not included with Windows Vista Starter.

Connect the computers

There are several ways to connect computers-the configuration depends on the type of network adapters, modem, and Internet connection that you have. It also depends on whether or not you want to share an Internet connection among all the computers on the network. The following sections briefly describe some connection methods.

Ethernet networks

You need a hub, switch, or router to connect computers using Ethernet. (For information about each type of hardware, see How do hubs, switches, routers, and access points differ?)

To share an Internet connection, you need to use a router. Connect the router to the computer that is connected to the modem (if you haven’t already done this).

home network install 1 How to Setup a Home Network

Ethernet network with wired router and a shared Internet connection

If your home or office is wired for Ethernet, set up the computers in rooms that have Ethernet jacks, and then plug them directly into the Ethernet jacks.

home network install 2 How to Setup a Home Network

Ethernet network using built-in Ethernet

Wireless networks

For wireless networks, run the Set Up a Wireless Router or Access Point wizard on the computer attached to the router. The wizard will walk you through the process of adding other computers and devices to the network.

home network install 3 How to Setup a Home Network

Wireless network with a shared Internet connection

HPNA networks

For HPNA networks, you need an HPNA network adapter in each computer and a phone jack in each room where there is a computer. Plug the computers into the phone jacks. The computers will be automatically connected.

Turn on all computers or devices, such as printers, that you want to be part of your network. If your network is wired Ethernet or HPNA, it should be set up and ready to use. You should test your network (see below) to make sure that all computers and devices are connected correctly.

Run the Set Up a Wireless Router or Access Point wizard

If your network is wireless, run the Set up a Wireless Router or Access Point wizard on the computer attached to the router.

• Open Set Up a Wireless Router or Access Point by clicking the Start button windows logo icon How to Setup a Home Network, clicking Control Panel, clicking Network and Internet, and then clicking Network and Sharing Center. In the left pane, click Set up a connection or network, and then click Set up a wireless router or access point.

The wizard will walk you through the process of adding other computers and devices to the network. For more information, see Add a device or computer to a network.

Enable sharing on your network

If you want to share files and printers on your network, make sure your network location type is set to Private and that network discovery, file sharing, and printer sharing are turned on. For more information, see Choosing a network location and Enable or disable network discovery.

Test your network

It’s a good idea to test your network to make sure that all of the computers and devices are connected and working properly. To test your network, do the following on each network computer: Click the Start button windows logo icon How to Setup a Home Network, and then click Network. You should be able to see icons for the computer you are on and all of the other computers and devices that you have added to the network. If the computer you are checking has a printer attached, the printer icon might not be visible on other computers until you enable printer sharing. (Printer sharing is not available on Windows Vista Starter.)

Note

It might take several minutes for computers running previous versions of Windows to appear in the Network folder.


Short Link - http://ngurl.me/1nu Posted on January 25, 2008 at 8:57 pm (PST)
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